Etiquette Quotes

Our selected quote of the day just for you!

A good character carries with it the highest power of causing a thing to be believed.
Aristotle

-One of our favorites – Check below for 5 Important Lessons.

A SMILE costs nothing, but gives much. It enriches those who receive, without making poorer those who give. It takes but a moment, but the memory of it sometimes last forever. None is so rich or mighty that he can get along without it, and none is so poor but that he can be made rich by it. A smile creates happiness in the home, fosters good will in business, and is the countersign of friendship. It brings rest to the weary, cheer to the discouraged, sunshine to the sad, and it is nature’s best antidote for trouble. Yet it cannot be bought, begged, borrowed, or stolen, for it is something that is of no value to anyone until it is given away. Some people are too tired to give you a smile. Give them one of yours, as none needs a smile so much as he who has no more to give.
Author Unknown

The ability to get along with people is as purchasable a commodity as sugar and coffee. I pay more for that ability than any under the sun.
John D Rockefeller

Sooner or later a man, if he is wise, discovers that life is a mixture of good days and bad, victory and defeat, give and take.
He learns that it doesn’t pay to be a sensitive soul–that he should let some things go over off a duck’s back.
He learns that he who loses his temper usually loses.
He learns that all men have burnt toast for breakfast now and then, and that he shouldn’t take the other fellow’s grouch too seriously.
He learns that carrying a chip on his shoulder is the easiest way to get into a fight.
He learns that the quickest way to become unpopular is to carry tales and gossip about others.
He learns that most people are human and that it doesn’t do any harm to smile and say “Good Morning” even if it is raining.
He learns that most of the other fellows are as ambitious as he is, that they have brains that are as good or better, and that hard work, and not cleverness, is the secret of success.
He learns that it doesn’t matter so much who gets the credit so long as the business shows a profit He comes to realize that the business could run along perfectly without him.
He learns to sympathize with the youngsters coming into the business, because he remembers how bewildered he was when he first started out.
He learns not to worry when he does not make a hit EVERY time, because experience has shown if he always gives his best, his average will break pretty well.
He learns that no man ever got to first base alone and that it is only through cooperative effort that we move on to better things.
He learns that the fellows are not any harder to get along with one place than another, and that “getting along” depends about 98 per cent on himself.

Success means we go to sleep at night knowing that our talents and abilities were used in a way that served others.
– Marianne Williamson

We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then is not an act, but a habit
Aristotle

Leadership is particularly important in the United States because, unlike Europe and Asia, no caste system has ever taken deep root in this country. In older, more static civilizations, because of a long tradition of monarchical and aristocratic rule, the leader is, so to speak, often “naturally” provided. A distinguished family name, a title, a uniform–sometimes all three combined–may suffice to establish the authority and prestige. His leadership position is rarely questioned; his right to wield power or exert influence is hardly challenged. He is, in the well-known phrase, “to the manner born.”
Not so in the United States. Here, the leader first has to prove himself to achieve his position, and secondly, he has to exert himself to retain it. This, in essence, is a part of America’s democratic dynamism. It was recognized long ago by an early democrat, Thomas Jefferson, that democracy, by rejecting the idea and the practice of a caste system, must therefore rely on what he called a “natural aristocracy.” Nature, he said, scatters human talents among all types of people, rich and poor alike, and this reservoir of abilities must be used for leadership and enrichment of democracy.
American life today exemplifies Jefferson’s conception of a natural aristocracy. Whether in business or government or the professions, America’s leaders are generally those whose positions were attained through individual effort and skill, rather than birth. Cases of inherited wealth and social status do exist among the leaders, but the majority, including the last two Presidents of the United States, come from modest homes. Surveys indicate that most leaders–mayors, presidents of civic organizations, members of Congress, heads of industries–are college graduates and, on community levels, more than half of them have professional degrees. The educational ladder–that is, training for positions of power and influence–still remains the primary avenue of advancement in American life.
International Business Machines Corporation, “How You Can Influence Foreign Policy”, THINK Magazine; Copyright 1959

There are moments in life,
when you miss someone so much,
that you want to pick them,
from your dreams and hug them.

Dream what you want to dream.
Go where you want to go.
Be what you want to be.
Because you have only one life,
and one chance to do all the things you want to do.

May you have enough happiness to make you sweet.
Enough trials to make you strong,
Enough sorrow to keep you human.
Enough hope to make you happy.

Always put yourself in others’ shoes.
If you feel that it hurts you,
it probably hurts the other person, too.

The happiest of people don’t necessarily
have the best of everything;
They just make the most of everything,
that comes along their way.

Happiness lives for those who cry,
those who hurt, have searched,
and those who tried.
For only they can appreciate
the importance of people, who have touched
their lives.

Love begins with a smile, grows with a kiss,
and ends with a tear.
The brightest future will always be based on
a forgotten past.
You can’t go on, well in life, until you let
go of your past failures, and heartaches.

When you were born, you were crying,
and everyone around you was smiling.
Live your life, so, that when you die,
you’re the one who is smiling, and everyone around you, is crying.

All great achievements require time
David J. Schwartz

My mother drew a distinction between achievement and success. She said that achievement is the knowledge that you have studied and worked hard and done the best that is in you. Success is being praised by others. That is nice but not as important or satisfying. Always aim for achievement and forget about success.
Helen Hayes (famous actress)

Great things are not done by impulse, but by a series of small things brought together.
Vincent Van Gogh (painter)

We tire of those pleasures we take, but never of those we give.
John Petit-Senn

Send A Message To Cynthia W. Lett

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